Maps/ Tracks

Some walking tracks in the Reserve

We’ve put together some walking tracks or circuits in the Reserve.

The map below – one we’ve been working on – shows the visitor the walking tracks of the Reserve and refers to the tracks and circuits described below. You can also view a pdf file in colour or in a print-suitable format here of the tracks and the map, to take with you.

Current draft of Reserve map

Current draft of Reserve map

Each of the following walks is paced to allow visitors to enjoy and appreciate the natural beauty of the Reserve. The indicated distances and times are approximate.

Coral Fern Walk

This is a gentle walk that starts at the north western end of the reservoir. Follow the boardwalk and then continue walking by the lakeside for a series of lovely views on the western side of the reservoir. You’ll enjoy rewarding bird watching here, as well as seeing the scrambling coral fern the walk is named for.

As you follow the gentle rises and falls in the naturalised path, you will pass through the cool, mossy and shady part of the Reserve. Ferns and fern trees flourish along the watercourse, with banksia, peppermint and messmate forest growing on the northern slope. A wide range of flowering shrubs, orchids and fungi can be seen in season, and there are many forest birds to spot.

  • Distance: 0.75km
  • Time: 30 mins
  • Rating: Easy/ moderate (well formed tracks with narrow naturalised sections and some tripping hazards.)

 Heart Starter Circuit

Add this to the end of the Coral Fern Walk or begin this walk at the northern side of Army Bridge.

Head uphill along Woodland Walk, alongside fern gully with thriving melaleuca, through a mini-forest of elderberry panax, and slopes of eucalypts, silver wattle, grasses and, in season, clouds of sweet bursaria. Keep an eye out for birds using the tree hollows in this area. You might see roaming echidnas, as well as possums and swamp wallabies at early dawn or at dusk. Head south to join Fred Borrman Track, working your way steadily uphill (parallel to Borrmans Street). The track is a little more naturalised here, working through native forest, with hop bitter pea and many flowers in season. Join Baringa Way at the highest point in the Reserve.

Proceed north east along Baringa Way to the intersection with Pipeline Track. Then either head south downhill along Pipeline Track to the Coral Fern Walk or join the George Toye Track from the Lincoln Street entrance.

  • Distance: 2.73km
  • Time: 1 to 2 hours
  • Rating: Difficult (includes steep sections and well formed tracks, along with narrow naturalised sections, some muddy sections in winter, with tripping hazards.)

 George Toye Track

Add this to the end of the Heart Starter Circuit, the end of the Coral Fern Walk or begin from the Lincoln Street entrance.

If starting from the end of the Coral Fern Walk, simply turn north uphill (steep rise) along Pipeline Track and continue from the Lincoln Street entrance.

This is a gentle, downhill stroll, with a scenic view into the Lincoln Street gorge on your right with messmate, fern trees, silver wattle and flowering shrubs in season. Continue on to the northern side of the reservoir, pausing at one of the picnic tables if you wish to take in the view. Follow the path to the south, past banksia, leptospermum, bushy needlewood and, in season, a wide range of lichens. You’ll pass the Margaret Adams Bridge to the right of the path. Take a break at this tranquil spot to watch the water flow under the bridge during the winter months. Then continue along the path and around to the west through lowland forest on your left and fern gully on your right. Enjoy a wide range of birdlife, flowering shrubs and wildflowers on this walk as well as finding native terrestrial orchids in season.

  • Distance: 1.26km
  • Time: 50 mins
  • Rating: Easy/ moderate (well formed tracks, gentle rises and falls with some steeper sections, with few tripping hazards.)

 

 

 

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