Golden pair

The Golden Whistler and White-eared Honeyeater

The White-eared Honeyeater (Lichenostomus leucotis) and Golden Whistler (Pachycephala pectoralis) are both found in the Reserve – see the Birdlist – and are described as moderately common here. They both provided bright, yellow punctuation to the green theme of autumn foliage.

These two birds, while being in two different areas of the Reserve, were both unconcerned by our presence.

The White-eared Honeyeater was in company with some other little brown birds, a habit noted by Tzaros (2005) in ‘Wildlife of the Box-Ironbark Country’ to occur in autumn and winter.  This bird was feeding from the foliage of a cassinia – they are described as insectivorous – taking a break to preen and whistle. These birds are also described as inquisitive. There is this delightful description of White-eared Honeyeaters using the hair and clothes of humans for nesting material in a 1929 edition of the naturalist publication ‘Emu’.

Shows White-eared Honeyeater, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

Looking..

Shows White-eared Honeyeater, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

Looking around….

Shows White-eared Honeyeater, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

White-eared Honeyeater

The male Golden Whister was collecting the insects found in this wild-grown apple tree. It is also described as inquisitive and tame by Tzaros (2005).  Here we see these birds through most of the year, with breeding time between September and January. The female of the species is just as cute, albeit with more subtle colouring – see the Morwell National Park for local examples.

Shows male Golden Whistler, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

Looking…

Shows male Golden Whistler, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

Looking around..

Shows male Golden Whistler, Edward Hunter Heritage Bush Reserve

Male Golden Whistler

References and further resources

Birds in Backyards (n.d.) Golden Whistler Basic Information  http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Pachycephala-pectoralis

Birds in Backyards (n.d.) White-eared Honeyeater Basic Information http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Lichenostomus-leucotis

Tzaros, C. L. (2005) Wildlife of the Box-Ironbark Country. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing

2 responses to “Golden pair

  1. absolutely stunning shots of these two beautiful species! Well done! I haven’t seen a Golden Whistler for a few years now but used to spot them and the Rufous Whistler regularly at the Traralgon flora and fauna reserve and Morwell National Park prior to the black saturday fires, so I am very happy to see they are at Edward Hunter reserve. As for the white-eared, I’ve not seen them much at all except for once at the Morwell wetlands revegetation area and one other time at Briagolong Blue Pools. I recall these incidents vividly because the yellow plumage on both species is so striking and spectacular to see. I’m drooling over your photos!!

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